Monthly Archives: July 2014

From Russia, with data…

Recently (Source: BBC News) it was reported that Russia are seeking to pass new laws requiring data about Russian citizens to be stored within the country, rather than in datacentres in the United States “where it can be hacked and given to criminals” (quoting MP Vadim Dengin).

At first glance this seems to be a relatively ridiculous stance to take, flimsily disguised as an attempt to protect the data of Russian citizens when actually many skeptics believe this is more about control which could lead to Russia becoming the next country with an iron-curtain firewall – much like China has operated for years. A key question is how will they enforce this in any way that would benefit Russian people?

Irrelevant of the motivations behind this move, there are potential implications for digital practitioners that need to be thought about going forward. For a start, if there is any possibility that a Russian is going to use your application and requires storing any data then that database will need to be stored in Russia. A shrewd move if Russia plans on creating datacentres, but from a practical point of view would the rest of the world want their data stored in Russia?

One option would be to develop the system so that anyone based in Russia has their data stored in a Russian version of the database. But let’s be honest, it isn’t really practical to go down this route. Where does it end? Do you have a database for each country that requires one?

At the other end of the spectrum is the consideration that you have to rule Russian customers out of your experience if they have to do any sort of account creation. For some sectors that may not be a concern. The Google’s, YouTube’s and Amazon’s of the world may decide this is a risk worth taking. But what about the investment sector, for example? Russia has a lot of wealth and ruling them out could be a big problem. Similarly, research becomes a lot more difficult. For an entity trying to undertake surveys Russia may be a key demographic but this may well rule them out of being included.

What is the reality? We think that this is likely to be a very hard thing for Russia to police and most likely they really are only targeting big companies. The only real way to enforce this is that Russian internet access becomes locked down in a utilitarian move to “protect data”, but which would actually be severely curtailing Russian freedoms online. If this is the case then any company serious about having a presence online in Russia would have to have a Russian version specifically for the purpose. Instead, what will most likely happen is that businesses will turn their backs on Russia and so we won’t need to worry anyway.

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Internet World 2014 – An agency owners viewpoint

(As featured at http://www.sitesetdigital.co.uk/tabletsilversurfers.html)

I recently attended the Internet World expo at The Excel Centre in London. This was a return visit for me but the first time I have attended as the Managing Director of an agency, so my aims for the day had somewhat changed. Previously, I had found the expo to be a very useful yardstick for what is important in the Digital sector and what the current trends of focus are for both clients and agencies. It has also been very useful to look at what other companies are developing in terms of products and to align these with our own efforts. Most importantly, in the past as a project manager it has allowed me to see what is at the cutting edge so that I can offer consultancy to clients about what they might want to consider for their own strategies.

This year I had new questions to answer, primarily would Internet World be a good platform for us to showcase our agency and our new CMS product. Additionally I wanted to look at what the key development trends are in similar technologies to our own, to make sure we are competitive and focussing in the right areas.

In my previous visits to Internet World I had found a good balance between information and sales opportunities, with a wide variety of providers to talk with, product demonstrations to view and seminar talks to attend. Overriding all of this, previously there seems to have been an overriding focus each year that brings the whole show together, with exhibitors complimenting this and seminar talks designed to further develop on this theme.

Attending this year with my new MD tinted glasses on was a very interesting experience. In looking to answer my key questions I first started by browsing the exhibitors. The first thing I noticed was there seemed to be fewer than last year, but the other thing I noticed was that quite a few of the comparable agencies to Siteset that I’d seen the previous year were absent this time around. This could be for a number of reasons, but one reading of this is that Internet World did not serve them well in terms of new business leads.

Looking to the product side of the fence, there were the usual big names this year. Sitecore were present, although notably with a more modest stand than they had last year. In fact in general the larger players seemed to be more confined, whereas last year a number of the stands were a feature in themselves. This could have been due to the more confined space of this year’s expo.

In terms of CMS products (one of the products our agency offer), there were really only three present on the day; Sitecore, Kentico and Cantarus (although other proprietary offerings were also there). Last year there were many other CMS products of varying scales on show, and I again noticed a lack of PHP technology in this area. Much like the failure of some agencies to have a return visit, it seems that perhaps this is not the right forum for emerging products to try and gain a foothold.

A new thing Internet World has worked on is the networking areas and this year this included a pitch area. Whilst this was an interesting listen, I think I got unlucky though in that I seemed to always be there when the people talking hadn’t rehearsed beforehand. Similarly The Marketplace had a pitch session, but the area was monopolised by people who wanted to use the beanbags as a place to catch up on emails rather than actually listening to the speakers and so the focus was rather lost.

So what about this year’s seminar talks? This is one of the key ways for attendees to pick up on the latest trends and see what is happening at the cutting edge. In the past I have found this is a really good way to see what other agencies are doing with their clients and products. Citrix was no exception, talking about their work towards the Internet of Everything. Whilst not particularly accessible to smaller agencies like ourselves it was fascinating to see what the future will hold and start to think about how we might generate ideas for products that will fit within that. It was a real example of work right on the fringe. But this year it seemed like this was a bit of an exception to an otherwise rather tame rule. A lot of the talks seemed to be very marketing based, particularly those by agencies, where most of the seminar was dedicated to selling their services rather than actually focussing on the work. This was, in large part, a contributor to a day that seemed to lack the seamless thread pulling the whole show together that previous years have had.

I realise that there is an element of the hypocritical about the way I am assessing the show this year. On one front I am asking whether an agency could go there and generate leads but on the other front I am criticising it when agencies do that very thing in seminars. But that is one of the fine lines that Internet World needs to draw and that some seminars achieve very well. Seminars provide a good insight into the work, which then subtly promote the agency behind it. But when the talk itself becomes about promoting the agency then all else is lost. It was notable how few questions were asked at the end of each talk, possibly a reflection on people being less than keen to be sold to, or perhaps even having lost interest.

So did I answer my questions? If I’d asked those questions at last year’s show I would have come away clearly thinking that this year we should have been there ourselves, showcasing our work and our product. But this year the focus had shifted. The smaller product owners were not there and the talks were not at all focussed on quality content. Instead the seminars featured people both trying and failing to sell their brand or talking about topics that were not particularly new, unless they were so far ahead of the game that for most it was just an interesting look into the future.

My questions remain somewhat unanswered at this point, but I am no longer convinced that Internet World is the place to learn about the latest tech and approaches. I’m certainly not convinced that it is a good platform for an agency to generate leads.

Tablet adoption and Silver Surfers…

(As featured at http://www.sitesetdigital.co.uk/tabletsilversurfers.html)

In a previous blog post we looked at how Millenials, those between the ages of 16 and 24, are accessing the internet more and more through their phones. It is now the case that mobile internet access (although not browsing) has surpassed desktop (Source: Mequoda.com), and from the data we featured in our previous blog it is clear that this is being driven by the Millenial and Young-Adult (25-34) groups. The latest data shows that internet usage through apps is growing, with tablet and phone browsing staying strong as well. But is this also a generational thing or is it across the board?

Age Group Browsing

At the opposite end of the spectrum to Millenials are the 55+ group, affectionately referred to as the ‘Silver Surfers’ (shown in the bottom left quadrant in the above infographic). This group is generally the most affluent of the four groups, with plenty of disposable income. They are also less time poor and despite being more well off are often more reluctant to spend their money.

Something that is immediately obvious in this age band is that the vast majority of internet access takes place via desktop or laptop (80%). Not unsurprisingly the level of smartphone access is very low as well (4%), but tablet usage (13%) is an emerging trend in this age group. In Q1 of 2012 only 4% of the Silver Surfer group reported that their household owned a tablet device (Source: Ofcom) compared to 19% by Q4 of 2013(Source: Ofcom). Even more significantly, of this 19% of Silver Surfers who own a tablet, 71% said they personally used the device.

There is a clear trend developing towards the adoption of tablets in the older generations and this may well become the mobile device of choice in this group. Intuitive interfaces and larger screens mean that it is a more comfortable experience, whilst the cost barrier is less of a deterrent for this more affluent group as well. Most importantly, they don’t feel the need to be online all the time whilst on the move, unlike the Millenials.

So what does this mean for Digital practitioners? Firstly there is an emerging and affluent group who are adopting tablet devices (and possibly in time smartphones with larger screens) to access the internet. Secondly, this is a group who are methodical, cautious and time rich. Thirdly, and most importantly, they are a group who have different needs and interests to younger generations, with expectations to match.

In planning for the mobile internet and the internet of things, this generation is going to play an interesting and more significant role over time. Responsive experiences are going to become as important in mobile as responsive design already is. Designing for this age group will be a different process to designing for Millenials. Similarly, there is a whole raft of apps that this age group would adopt that simply aren’t relevant to younger generations. This is only further supported by the release of health related hardware and a Silver Surfer generation who are more health conscious.